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Magnetosphere Seminars – Fall 2009

Magnetosphere Seminars

Illustration of Sun-Earth connection. When CME's blast through the Sun's outer atmosphere and plow toward Earth at speeds of thousands of miles per second, the resulting effects can be harmful to communication satellites and astronauts outside the Earth's magnetosphere. On the ground, the magnetic storm wrought by these solar particles can knock out electric power. (Courtesy Steele Hill/NASA)

Below is a schedule of the informal LASP Magnetospheres Seminars for the Fall 2009 Semester. Except where noted, seminars will be held on Tuesday afternoons in room LSTB-206 at 3:30 pm.

LASP holds a series of informal seminars focused on space physics and plasma research relating to the magnetospheres of Earth and other planets. The intended audience is space and planetary physics researchers in the Boulder area, although in most instances any interested persons are welcome to attend.

For more information or if you have questions, please contact:

  • Stefan Eriksson at (email:
    firstname.lastname@lasp.colorado.edu)


Fall Semester 2009 Schedule:

August 25, 2010

A fast regime of reconnection in high Lundquist number plasmas

  Speaker: Giovanni Lapenta KU Leuven, Belgium
Time: 4:00-5:00 p.m., refreshments served at 3:45 p.m.
Location: LSTB-206
Abstract:  
September 8, 2009

Observations of double layers in Earth’s plasma sheet

  Speaker: Bob Ergun (LASP)
Time: 4:00-5:00 p.m., refreshments served at 3:45 p.m.
Location: LSTB-206
Abstract:

September 15, 2009

Movie-maps of low-latitude storm-time magnetic disturbance

  Speaker: Jeffrey Love (USGS)
Time: 4:00-5:00 p.m., refreshments served at 3:45 p.m.
Location: LSTB-206
Abstract:

September 22, 2009

A one-sided aspect of Alfvenic fluctuations in the solar wind

  Speaker: Jack Gosling (LASP)
Time: 4:00-5:00 p.m., refreshments served at 3:45 p.m.
Location: LSTB-206
Abstract:

September 29, 2009

Assimilative modeling of large-scale equatorial plasma trenches observed by the Communication/Navigation Forecasting System (C/NOFS)

  Speaker: Yi-Jiun Su (AFRL)
Time: 4:00-5:00 p.m., refreshments served at 3:45 p.m.
Location: LSTB-206
Abstract:

October 6, 2009

THEMIS observation of ULF waves in the inner magnetosphere

  Speaker: Wenlong Liu (LASP)
Time: 4:00-5:00 p.m., refreshments served at 3:45 p.m.
Location: LSTB-206
Abstract:

October 8, 2009

Diffuse, monoenergetic, broadband (wave) and ion aurora:
Results from a new generation precipitation model

  Speaker: Patrick Newell (JHU/APL)
Time: 4:00-5:00 p.m., refreshments served at 3:45 p.m.
Location: LSTB-206
Abstract:

October 13, 2009

Measurement of high frequency density turbulence in the solar wind

  Speaker: David Malaspina (LASP)
Time: 4:00-5:00 p.m., refreshments served at 3:45 p.m.
Location: LSTB-206
Abstract:

October 20, 2009

Quantification of the precipitation loss of radiation belt electrons observed by SAMPEX

  Speaker: Weichao Tu (LASP)
Time: 4:00-5:00 p.m., refreshments served at 3:45 p.m.
Location: LSTB-206
Abstract: Based on SAMPEX/PET observations, the rates and the spatial and temporal variations of electron loss to the atmosphere in the Earth’s radiation belt were quantified using a Drift-Diffusion model that includes the effects of azimuthal drifts and pitch angle diffusion. The measured electrons by SAMPEX can be distinguished as trapped, quasi-trapped (in the drift loss cone), and precipitating (in the bounce loss cone). The Drift-Diffusion model simulates the low-altitude electron distribution from SAMPEX. After fitting the model results to the data, the magnitudes and variations of the electron lifetime can be quantitatively determined based on the optimum model parameter values. Three magnetic storms of different magnitudes were selected to estimate the various loss rates of ~0.5 to 3 MeV electrons during different phases of the storm and at L shells ranging from L=3.5 to L=6.5 (L represents the radial distance in the equatorial plane under a dipole field approximation). They are a small storm and a moderate storm in the current solar minimum and an intense storm right after the previous solar maximum. Model results for the three individual events showed that fast precipitation losses of relativistic electrons, as short as hours, persistently occurred in the storm main phases and with more efficient loss at higher energies, over wide range of L regions and over all the SAMPEX covered local times. In addition to this newly discovered common feature of the main phase electron loss for all the storm events and at all L locations, some other properties of the electron loss rates that vary with time or locations, were also estimated and discussed. This method combining model with the low-altitude observations provides direct quantification of the electron loss rate, a prerequisite for any comprehensive modeling of the radiation belt electron dynamics.
October 27, 2009

From satellite-magnetosphere interaction to auroral emissions:
Power transfer and electron acceleration

  Speaker: Sebastien Hess (LASP)
Time: 4:00-5:00 p.m., refreshments served at 3:45 p.m.
Location: LSTB-206
Abstract:

 

November 3, 2009

Ground-based observations of Jupiter’s H3+ infrared aurora

  Speaker: Makenzie Lystrup (LASP)
Time: 4:00-5:00 p.m., refreshments served at 3:45 p.m.
Location: LSTB-206
Abstract:

November 10, 2009

THEMIS observation of reconnection-associated Hall field at the magnetopause: First results from Hall MHD-based reconstruction

  Speaker: Wai-Leong Teh (LASP)
Time: 4:00-5:00 p.m., refreshments served at 3:45 p.m.
Location: LSTB-206
Abstract:

 

November 17, 2009

Flickering aurora studies using high speed cameras

  Speaker: Matthew McHarg (USAF Academy)
Time: 4:00-5:00 p.m., refreshments served at 3:45 p.m.
Location: LSTB-206
Abstract:

 

November 24, 2009

NO SEMINAR

  Speaker: N/A
Time: 4:00-5:00 p.m., refreshments served at 3:45 p.m.
Location: LSTB-206
Abstract:

 

December 1, 2009

First reconnecting flux tubes

  Speaker: Laila Andersson (LASP)
Time: 4:00-5:00 p.m., refreshments served at 3:45 p.m.
Location: LSTB-206
Abstract:

 

December 8, 2009

Fall AGU practice

  Speaker: N/A
Time: 4:00-5:00 p.m., refreshments served at 3:45 p.m.
Location: LSTB-206
Abstract:

 

December 15, 2009

Fall AGU meeting

  Speaker: N/A
Time: 4:00-5:00 p.m., refreshments served at 3:45 p.m.
Location: LSTB-206
Abstract: