Seminars for Scientists

Spring 2011 Schedule:

1/14/2011 – Deepwater Horizon atmospheric emissions constrain air-water partitioning, hydrocarbon fate, and leak rate

Speaker:   T.B. Ryerson (Chemical Sciences Division, NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, Boulder, CO)
Date & Time:   January 14, 2011 ,  4:00pm Location: Duane D-142

Abstract:
 

The fate of deepwater releases of gas and oil is initially determined by solubility and volatility of individual hydrocarbon species; these attributes determine partitioning between air and water. Quantifying this air-water partitioning is necessary to constrain simulations of gas and oil transport, to predict marine bioavailability of different fractions of the gas-oil mixture, and to… Read more »

1/20/2011 – The Open-Cellular Cloud System as a Coupled Oscillator

Speaker:   Graham Feingold (NOAA ESRL CSD)
Date & Time:   January 20, 2011 ,  4:00pm Location: Duane D-142

Abstract:
 

We explore the underlying principles of self-organization behind closed- and open-cellular mesoscale cloud structures in cloud fields off the west coast of continents. Early surface observations in the 1930s drew parallels to Rayleigh-Benard convection but it was only with the advent of meteorological satellites that observations of mesoscale cellular organization became commonplace. Recent evidence has… Read more »

2/10/2011 – Radar observation of meteor generated plasmas: understanding the impacts billions of sand and dust sized meteoroids

Speaker:   Lars Dyrud (Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory)
Date & Time:   February 10, 2011 ,  4:00pm Location: Duane D-142

Abstract:
 

Over 100 kilotons of meteoric material hits the Earth every year, yet the average mass, velocity (15-55 km/s), and chemical composition of the particles comprising this mass flux remain poorly constrained. This is because the vast majority of this flux is composed of particles of micron size that are no larger than a grain of… Read more »

3/31/201 – The Lunar Atmosphere: Some Ado About Almost Nothing

Speaker:   Richard Hodges (LASP)
Date & Time:   March 31, 2011 ,  4:00pm Location: LSTB-299

Abstract:
 

Prior to the Apollo era the lunar atmosphere was thought to be a collision-less, ballistic conduit for thermal evaporation that balances the inflow of solar wind ions with their loss as neutrals. However, the first atmospheric species to be identified on the moon was radiogenic argon-40, and its identification was the indirect result of a… Read more »

1/14/2011 – Deepwater Horizon atmospheric emissions constrain air-water partitioning, hydrocarbon fate, and leak rate

Speaker:   T.B. Ryerson (Chemical Sciences Division, NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, Boulder, CO)
Date & Time:   January 14, 2011 ,  4:00 PM Location: Duane D-142

Abstract:
 

The fate of deepwater releases of gas and oil is initially determined by solubility and volatility of individual hydrocarbon species; these attributes determine partitioning between air and water. Quantifying this air-water partitioning is necessary to constrain simulations of gas and oil transport, to predict marine bioavailability of different fractions of the gas-oil mixture, and to… Read more »

1/20/2011 – The Open-Cellular Cloud System as a Coupled Oscillator

Speaker:   Graham Feingold (NOAA ESRL CSD)
Date & Time:   January 20, 2011 ,  4:00 PM Location: Duane D-142

Abstract:
 

We explore the underlying principles of self-organization behind closed- and open-cellular mesoscale cloud structures in cloud fields off the west coast of continents. Early surface observations in the 1930s drew parallels to Rayleigh-Benard convection but it was only with the advent of meteorological satellites that observations of mesoscale cellular organization became commonplace. Recent evidence has… Read more »

2/10/2011 – Radar observation of meteor generated plasmas: understanding the impacts billions of sand and dust sized meteoroids

Speaker:   Lars Dyrud (Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory)
Date & Time:   February 10, 2011 ,  4:00 PM Location: Duane D-142

Abstract:
 

Over 100 kilotons of meteoric material hits the Earth every year, yet the average mass, velocity (15-55 km/s), and chemical composition of the particles comprising this mass flux remain poorly constrained. This is because the vast majority of this flux is composed of particles of micron size that are no larger than a grain of… Read more »

3/31/2011 – The Lunar Atmosphere: Some Ado About Almost Nothing

Speaker:   Richard Hodges (LASP)
Date & Time:   March 31, 2011 ,  4:00 PM Location: LSTB-299

Abstract:
 

Prior to the Apollo era the lunar atmosphere was thought to be a collision-less, ballistic conduit for thermal evaporation that balances the inflow of solar wind ions with their loss as neutrals. However, the first atmospheric species to be identified on the moon was radiogenic argon-40, and its identification was the indirect result of a… Read more »