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Seminars for Scientists

The LASP Spring 2013 Science Seminar Series has begun! See upcoming talks listed below. We still have open slots and are actively recruiting new speakers. If you or a colleague would like to give a seminar this spring please contact the Seminar Organizer Xu Wang (firstname.lastname at lasp.colorado.edu). LASP seminars are held every Thursday at 4:00 PM in the SPSC building, generally in room W120. Refreshments are served at 3:45. All LASP science seminars are open to visitors and our colleagues in other departments.



Spring Schedule:

1/17/2013 Seminar – TBD

Speaker:   Scott McIntosh
Date:   1/17/2013
Time:   4:00 PM
Location:   SPSC N100 (Note alternate room)
Abstract:  

TBD

1/24/2013 Seminar – TBD

Speaker:   Dr. Xinlin Li
Date:   1/24/2013
Time:   4:00 PM
Location:   SPSC W120
Abstract:  

TBD

1/25/2013 – SORCE Seminar

Speaker:   SORCE Scientists
Date:   1/25/2013
Time:   4:00 PM
Location:   SPSC W120
Abstract:  

Review of the SORCE mission accomplishments.

Coronal Mass Ejections and Space Weather

Speaker:   David Webb (Boston College)
Date:   1/31/2013
Time:   4:00 PM
Location:   SPSC W120
Abstract:  

What are Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and why are they important? CMEs have typically been observed in white light near the Sun by coronagraphs, recently those on the SOHO LASCO and STEREO missions. I will review our current knowledge of CMEs including their coronal and heliospheric properties. I will discuss their importance for space weather, […]

The Zodiacal Dust Cloud Populations at Saturn: an inventory from the Cassini-CDA point of view

Speaker:   Nicolas Altobelli (ESA)
Date:   2/7/2013
Time:   4:00 PM
Location:   SPSC N100 (note alternate room)
Abstract:  

The analysis of different CDA subsystems data, acquired since SOI, reveals that the Saturnian system is permanently crossed by dust grains originating from the Interplanetary medium, as well as from the neighboring interstellar medium surrounding the Solar System. We observe two main types of particles: on the one hand, those with low injection velocity with […]

Thermosphere-Ionosphere Climate during the 2008-2009 Solar Cycle Minimum

Speaker:   Stan Solomon (NCAR)
Date:   2/14/2013
Time:   4:00 PM
Location:   SPSC W120
Abstract:  

Observations of the neutral thermosphere during the extended 2008-2009 solar minimum period found anomalously low density, implying that thermospheric temperature was also lower than usual for solar minimum.  A variety of solar measurements and proxies indicated commensurately lower levels of solar extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance, although there remains considerable uncertainty concerning the magnitude of the reduction. […]

The Revolution in Planetary Science

Speaker:   James L. Green (NASA-HQ)
Date:   2/21/2013
Time:   4:00 PM
Location:   SPSC W120
Abstract:  

It has now been 50 years since NASA had launched its first successful planetary spacecraft. Virtually everything we knew about the solar system, up to that time, came from ground-based telescope observations or the analysis of meteorites. NASA has literally invented planetary science that has allowed us to reveal many of the wonders of the […]

2/28/2013 No Seminar

Speaker:   no seminar
Date:   2/28/2013
Time:   no seminar
Location:   no seminar
Abstract:  

no seminar

3/7/2013 No Seminar

Speaker:   no seminar
Date:   3/7/2013
Time:   no seminar
Location:   no seminar
Abstract:  

no seminar

Two Levels of Self-Organization in the Earth’s Climate System

Speaker:   Lev Maslov (Aims College)
Date:   March 14, 2013
Time:   4:00 PM
Location:   SPSC w120
Abstract:  

The global, long-term temperature variations curve constructed  from Antarctica ice-core project data is decomposed  into two parts: the “auto-oscillation” part and the “convective” part. These two parts represent two different but tightly interconnected processes and, correspondingly, two different types of self-organization of the Earth’s climate system. The self-organization in the “auto-oscillation” component is the non-linear reaction of the Earth’s […]

3/14/2013 Seminar

Speaker:   Lev Maslov
Date:   3/14/2013
Time:   4:00 PM
Location:   SPSC W120
Abstract:  

The global, long-term temperature variations curve constructed  from Antarctica ice-core project data is decomposed  into two parts: the “auto-oscillation” part and the “convective” part. These two parts represent two different but tightly interconnected processes and, correspondingly, two different types of self-organization of the Earth’s climate system. The self-organization in the “auto-oscillation” component is the non-linear reaction of the Earth’s […]

3/21/2013 Seminar

Speaker:   TBD
Date:   3/21/2013
Time:   4:00 PM
Location:   SPSC W120
Abstract:  

TBD

3/28/2013 SPRING BREAK – NO SEMINAR

Speaker:   no seminar
Date:   3/28/2013
Time:   no seminar
Location:   no seminar
Abstract:  

Spring Break – No Seminar

4/4/2013 MESSENGER Observations of Mercury’s Magnetosphere

Speaker:   Catherine Johnson
Date:   4/4/2013
Time:   4:00 PM
Location:   SPSC N100
Abstract:  

The MESSENGER spacecraft has been in orbit around Mercury since March 2011. Magnetic field measurements taken by MESSENGER have yielded definitive evidence for a weak dipolar internal field, generated by dynamo action in Mercury’s core.  The weak field, together with Mercury’s proximity to the sun, mean that Mercury’s magnetosphere is small and highly dynamic, responding […]

4/11/2013 Seminar

Speaker:   Keith Julien (CU) (Cancelled)
Date:   4/11/2013
Time:   4:00 PM
Location:   SPSC W120
Abstract:  

TBD

4/18 seminar ARTEMIS Pick-up Ion Observations in the Terrestrial Magnetotail: Implications for the Lunar Neutral Exosphere

Speaker:   Andrew Poppe (UC-Berkeley)
Date:   4/18/2013
Time:   4:00 PM
Location:   SPSC W120
Abstract:  

The Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence, and Electrodynamics of Moon’s Interaction with the Sun (ARTEMIS) mission is a dual-probe plasma and fields mission currently in orbit around the Moon. Among its many scientific objectives is to study pick-up ions at the Moon, with the goal of understanding both pick-up ion production mechanisms, such as photo-ionization, sputtering and […]

4/25/2013 Migration of Saturn’s small moons and implications for theories of planet formation

Speaker:   Benjamin Bromley (University of Utah)
Date:   4/25/2013
Time:   4:00 PM
Location:   SPSC W120
Abstract:  

The radial motions of small moons in Saturn’s rings can provide excellent tests of satellite  migration models.  In theory, radial drifts arise from a torque exchange between these moons and ring particles.  We predict that moons of radius 2–20 km in the A ring are massive enough to clear a gap in the ring, yet […]

5/2/2013 The Radiation Environment on Mars measured by RAD on MSL

Speaker:   Don Hassler (SwRI)
Date:   5/2/2013
Time:   4:00 PM
Location:   SPSC W120
Abstract:  

An important part of assessing present and past habitability of Mars is to understand and characterize “life limiting factors” on the surface, such as the radiation environment. Radiation exposure is also a major concern for future human missions and characterizing the radiation environment, both on the surface of Mars and inside the spacecraft during the […]

5/16/2013 Experimental Study of Vapor Released in Micrometeoroid Bombardment

Speaker:   Andrew Collette
Date:   May 16
Time:   4:00pm
Location:   SPSC N100
Abstract:  

We present laboratory measurement of vapor produced by simulated micrometeoroid bombardment, with direct relevance to the study of surface-bounded exospheres around the Moon, Mercury and other solar system bodies. Exciting new in-situ observations from MESSENGER at Mercury, and the anticipation of results from LADEE at the Moon, have highlighted the uncertainty surrounding the role of […]

5/23/2013 What’s the big deal about Comet ISON?

Speaker:   Matthew Knight (Lowell Observatory)
Date:   May 23
Time:   4:00 pm
Location:   SPSC W120
Abstract:  

Comet ISON (C/2012 S1) is a recently discovered sungrazing comet that will reach perihelion in November 2013 less than 2 solar radii from the Sun’s photosphere. While it is still more than 3.5 AU from the Sun and is currently relatively faint, it is predicted to become very bright near perihelion and has therefore gained […]

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