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Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics

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Earth Magnetosphere Earth magnetoshere: basic dipolar magnetosphere with distance to sub-solar magnetopause (Rmp).
Credit: Fran Bagenal & Steve Bartlett

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Comparing magnetospheres Comparison of planetary magnetospheres: Mercury, Earth, Jupiter, Heliosphere.
Credit: Fran Bagenal & Steve Bartlett

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Comparing magnetospheres Comparison of planetary magnetospheres: Mercury, Earth, Saturn, Jupiter.
Credit: Fran Bagenal & Steve Bartlett

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Tilts Tilts of planetary magnetic fields with respect to their rotation axes.
Credit: Fran Bagenal & Steve Bartlett

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Earth & Jupiter Magnetospheres Earth and Jupiter Magnetosphere Comparison.
Credit: Fran Bagenal & Steve Bartlett

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Size of Jupiter's magnetosphere in the sky Size of Jupiter’s magnetosphere in the sky.
Credit: Fran Bagenal & Steve Bartlett

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Size of Jupiter's magnetosphere in the sky Size of Jupiter’s magnetosphere in the sky.
Credit: Fran Bagenal & Steve Bartlett

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Magnetosphere scaling by stand off distance Magnetospheres scaled by stand-off distance of dipole field.
Credit: Fran Bagenal & Steve Bartlett

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Magnetosphere scaling absolute Magnetospheres on absolute scales.
Credit: Fran Bagenal & Steve Bartlett

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Magnetosphere scaling to planet radius Magnetosphere scaling to planet radius.
Credit: Fran Bagenal & Steve Bartlett

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Jupiter's magnetosphere with black field lines Jupiter’s Magnetosphere.
Credit: Fran Bagenal & Steve Bartlett

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Jupiter's magnetosphere with white field lines Jupiter’s Magnetosphere.
Credit: Fran Bagenal & Steve Bartlett

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Khurana Jupiter diagram Magnetic field topology of Jupiter’s magnetosphere (based on magnetic field model of Krishan Khurana).
Credit: Fran Bagenal & Steve Bartlett

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Juno trajectory Trajectory of the Juno spacecraft through the magnetosphere of Jupiter.
Credit: Fran Bagenal & Steve Bartlett

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Io's interaction with the magnetosphere Interaction of the magnetosphere with Io (2 views).
Credit: Fran Bagenal & Steve Bartlett

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Io's interaction with the magnetosphere Interaction of the magnetosphere with Io (4 views).
Credit: Fran Bagenal & Steve Bartlett

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Ganymede Magnetosphere of Ganymede based on model of Xianzhe Jia (JGR, 113, 6212, 2008), with location of auroral emissions (in blue).

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Jupiter book cover Cover of the book Jupiter: The Planet, Satellites & Magnetosphere (Cambridge University Press, 2004).
Credit: John Spencer (Southwest Research Institute)

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Io Torus The magnetosphere of Jupiter and Io plasma torus.
Credit: John Spencer (Southwest Research Institute)

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Aurora and Flux Tubes Fluxtubes connecting the Galilean satellites to Jupiter, plus the aurora at the foot of their fluxtubes.
Credit: John Clarke & John Spencer

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Saturn Magnetosphere Saturn’s magnetosphere. (See Bagenal, Nature 433, 695-696, 2005.)
Credit: Fran Bagenal & Steve Bartlett

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Saturn magnetosphere and aurora Saturn’s Magnetosphere, with asymmetric plasma disk and Hubble images of UV aurora (see Bagenal, Nature 433, 695-696, 2005; Clarke et al. Nature 433, 717–719, 2005; Bagenal, Science, 316, 380-381, 2007).
Credit: Fran Bagenal & Steve Bartlett

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Uranus tilted magnetosphere The magnetosphere of Uranus at solstice (the time of the Voyager 2 flyby). Upper left and right panels show the configuration at different phases of the planet’s 18-hour spin period (see Bagenal, Ann. Rev. Earth Planet. Sci., 20, 289, 1992). The lower panel shows a numerical simulation of the helical magnetotail (Toth et al., JGR, 109, A11210, 2004).

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Neptune tilted magnetosphere The magnetosphere of Neptune in the configuration corresponding tothe time of the Voyager 2 fly-by (see Bagenal, Ann. Rev. Earth Planet. Sci., 20, 289, 1992). Over the 19-hour spin period the magnetospheric plasma sheet in the tail changes from roughly planar to cylindrical.

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Venus magnetosphere The draping of tubes of solar magnetic flux around a conducting ionosphere such as that of Venus. The flux tubes are slowed down and sink into the wake to form a tail (after Saunders and Russell 1986).

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Mars Interaction of the solar wind with the atmosphere, ionosphere, and magnetized crust of Mars. The several processes whereby the planet may have lost much of its atmosphere are shown.
Credit: Fran Bagenal & Steve Bartlett

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