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PROPOSED UPDATE TO DESCRIPTION ON SPACE WEATHER JOURNAL WEB SITE:


Proposed update for the website: 

Space Weather: The International Journal of Research and Applications is an online publication devoted to the field of space weather and its impact on the design and operations of technical and engineered systems, including telecommunications, electric power, and satellite navigation. The journal’s readers include engineers, system operators, systems designers, space weather forecasters, space weather modelers, as well as the research community.  

Since the era of development of the initial electrical telegraph systems in the early 19th century, the solar-terrestrial environment has influenced the design and operations of ever-increasing and sophisticated technical systems. James Van Allen reported in 1958 that the space environment around the Earth was not benign, but rather composed of high-intensity radiation. Engineers and scientists immediately recognized from this discovery that technical systems such as the communications satellites envisioned by Arthur Clark and John Pierce would require design and operations procedures (and therefore costs) that had not been otherwise anticipated. Space Weather addresses these and all engineered systems that are affected by solar-produced processes, from ground currents in electrical grids, communication cables, and pipelines, to GPS navigation to HF radio propagation.

Space Weather is a research resource that also provides news and information for space weather professionals. Space Weather publishes:

  • peer-reviewed articles presenting the latest engineering and science research in the field, including studies of the response of technical systems to specific space weather events, predictions of detrimental space weather impacts, and effects of natural radiation on aerospace systems;
  • feature articles that describe specialized topics in space weather, from history to new developments to national activities to interviews with space weather professionals. Feature Articles are 2000 words in length and can contain three figures;
  • news articles and book reviews. News articles provide up-to-date coverage of government agency initiatives worldwide and space weather activities of the commercial sector. These articles can be 500 to 1000 words and can contain one figure;
  • letters and opinion articles offering an exchange of ideas; these articles are 500 words or less;
  • editorial comments on current issues facing the community.

Currently on the website:

Space Weather: The International Journal of Research and Applications is an online publication devoted to the emerging field of space weather and its impact on technical systems, including telecommunications, electric power, and satellite navigation.
Space Weather is a research resource that also provides news and information for space weather professionals. Space Weather publishes:

  • peer-reviewed articles presenting the latest engineering and science research in the field, including studies of the response of technical systems to specific space weather events,predictions of detrimental space weather impacts, and effects of natural radiation on aerospace systems;
  • news and feature articles providing up-to-date coverage of government agency initiatives worldwide and space weather activities of the commercial sector;
  • letters and opinion articles offering an exchange of ideas; and
  • editorial comments on current issues facing the community. 

Space Weather is published by the American Geophysical Union and is co-sponsored by the International Space Environment Service (ISES). A digest of the online publication, Space Weather Quarterly (ISSN 1539-4964), is distributed four times a year free of charge.


From the First Issue:

The primary goal of Space Weather: The International Journal of Research and Applications is to promote communication among scientists, engineers, technicians, science administrators, and space weather policy makers in a way that leads to continuous improvement in the nation's ability to mitigate space environment hazards to technical systems on the ground and in space.

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